If you’re looking to replace your countertops, you probably have a tidy list of what you want in a surface: durability, ease of maintenance, and resistance to both heat and bacteria. But if you take that tidy list of yours into a showroom, you might find yourself becoming instantly overwhelmed. There are so many different types of materials—each with unique colors and patterns and qualities. And this isn’t a new pair of shoes we’re talking about—invest poorly in a countertop and you could be wasting thousands of dollars.

To help make this decision less daunting, we asked a panel of professionals. Read on to learn from their experiences and preferences so that you can make the most educated decision about your new countertop.

Christian Antonoff

Christian Antonoff

Christian Antonoff is a content writer at Excel Template. He has worked as a journalist and is passionate about music, concerts, and coffee. In his spare time, he loves to travel and attend art exhibitions.

Quartz

As a long-time marketer who mostly works from home, I use every opportunity I have to fix things when I’m not doing my job. I love to get my hands dirty, especially inside the house.

The kitchen is the place where I spend the least amount of time, but my wife literally sleeps there. That’s why working in the kitchen is a work in progress.

Last year, we had to change the countertops. My wife opted for quartz ones. For sure, they are pricey, and there are some cheaper and sturdier alternatives.

Why we chose them then?

First, they look classy. My wife loves them, my bank account not so much. The quartz goes nicely with the walls of our kitchen, which are painted white. It gives a modern flavor to our more traditional-looking kitchen.

My wife likes our new countertop, as it doesn’t require much maintenance and is resistant to bacteria and heat. These types of surfaces are made to withstand temperatures as high as 150 ̊ C / 300 ̊ F.
If cleaned properly the quartz countertop does not allow for any bacteria to get into it. Many manufacturers also treat these countertops with a germ-fighting coating that enhances hygiene.

Quartz countertops are [also] quite durable. Made from an engineered composite of ground quartz, resin, and pigment, they can take a hit. My wife often drops cups and pots on them, and so far, the quartz countertops have endured everything. I have noticed that quartz is also stain and scratch-resistant, which is cool because I love to chop things on it. I have yet to see a scratch.

Quartz – quite durable

In my 15 years of experience, quartzite is the most durable and dense material to use for countertops; you need these two [qualities] to sustain heat and avoid bacterial growth on your counters. [It is] something beautiful that requires extremely low maintenance.

Engineered quartz has gained popularity over the years because it is hard and easy to clean. The hardness comes from the quartz that is ground down and mixed with resin. So yes, it is very durable, but because of the resin, it can still burn, whereas the quartzite countertop won’t.

Mikey Wu

Mikey Wu

Mikey Wu, CEO of a marble lifestyle accessory company called MIKOL.
Leonard Ang

Leonard Ang

Leonard Ang, Marketing Manager at AQVA.

Granite

Choosing the right countertop for your kitchen may be a tough challenge with all the options being presented and available. There are so many factors to consider when choosing the right one for you. Is it heat resistant? Does it break easily? How well do you have to maintain it? These are just some of the questions you might have in mind when considering your choices.

Out of all the options for a kitchen countertop, I believe that granite has an edge above all the rest. Granite is heat-resistant so if ever you need to place a hot pot on top of it, you won’t have to worry much. It is also very tough which means it can resist cracks and chips. With maintenance, you just have to apply a sealer annually so that your granite countertop could stand up to stains.

Granite – resistant to bacteria

The most durable countertops out there are made of granite. Granite is crystallized magma. It can handle the heat! Granite is also resistant to bacteria as long as the surface is resealed regularly.

Lisa Torelli-Sauer

Lisa Torelli-Sauer

Lisa Torelli-Sauer – Editor at Sensible Digs.

This is a crowdsourced article. Contributors are not necessarily affiliated with this website and their statements do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this website, other people, businesses, or other contributors.